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An & Ria's First Flight

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I don't even care it's a Vodafone ad, this is the sweetest thing  
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pfctdayelise
7 days ago
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fully endorse
Melbourne, Australia
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Sculptures Made from Cut and Curled Paper by Gunjan Aylawadi

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Sculptures Made from Cut and Curled Paper by Gunjan Aylawadi sculpture paper birds

From the series “Lost & Found”

Sculptures Made from Cut and Curled Paper by Gunjan Aylawadi sculpture paper birds

From the series “Lost & Found” | detail

Sculptures Made from Cut and Curled Paper by Gunjan Aylawadi sculpture paper birds

“Against the Wind”

Sculptures Made from Cut and Curled Paper by Gunjan Aylawadi sculpture paper birds

“Against the Wind” | detail

Sculptures Made from Cut and Curled Paper by Gunjan Aylawadi sculpture paper birds

“Against the Wind” | detail

Sculptures Made from Cut and Curled Paper by Gunjan Aylawadi sculpture paper birds

“Derweze”

Sculptures Made from Cut and Curled Paper by Gunjan Aylawadi sculpture paper birds

“Derweze” | detail

Sculptures Made from Cut and Curled Paper by Gunjan Aylawadi sculpture paper birds

“Derweze” | detail

Sculptures Made from Cut and Curled Paper by Gunjan Aylawadi sculpture paper birds

“Rabie” | Spring, breeze in Arabic

Sculptures Made from Cut and Curled Paper by Gunjan Aylawadi sculpture paper birds

“Rabie” | detail

Sculptures Made from Cut and Curled Paper by Gunjan Aylawadi sculpture paper birds

“Rabie” | detail

The Sydney, Australia-based artist Gunjan Aylawadi creates intricate, colorful sculptures that appear to resemble woven textiles. However, upon closer observation, her work—inspired by patterns and motifs in Islamic art—are made entirely from curled paper. The process, long and intricate, can cost the artist months on a single artwork. And not just any old paper will do. For example, “Against the Wind” is made from hand-cut strips of paper from old music books, which are then individually hand rolled and assembled. Although complicated, Aylawadi’s reasons for making art are simple: “What I enjoy most about making my work is the experience people have when they look at it,” she says. “They stop for a moment to have a closer look and the moment turns into long minutes of being fascinated by the beauty a simple medium like paper can add to the work infront of their eyes.” (via Lustik) lustik)

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pfctdayelise
7 days ago
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Melbourne, Australia
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Tech Volunteers, EFF Needs Your Help

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Donate a Few Hours to Help Us Create a Free Software Backend for Contacting Congress, Make the World a Better Place for Digital Rights

For years, EFF has been helping concerned technology users contact Congress. The EFF community stopped SOPA, we fought back privacy-invasive cybersecurity proposals, we are championing software patent reform, and now we’re demanding real NSA reform—not a fake fix.

But we’re at an impasse. Our community has grown significantly in the last few years, and every day we’re confronted with more reasons that users need to be speaking to lawmakers. But no one has a good system for contacting Congress.

Right now, EFF pays a for-profit company using proprietary software so that our friends and members can stop Congress from enacting dumb laws that hurt the Internet.

This rubs us the wrong way. At EFF, we like to practice what we preach, but our third-party action center suffers from proprietary licensing and limited configurability. When we find bugs, we can’t always fix them ourselves or hack around the problem.

It shouldn’t be this way. We shouldn’t have to compromise our principles just so that our friends and members can speak out about important issues. We shouldn’t have to sacrifice security, customizability, or freedom when engaging in political activism.

 We can build something new. And better.

For the last few months, EFF and our partners at the Sunlight Foundation have been working on a way to revolutionize how everyday people contact Congress. The resource we're building with Sunlight is in the public domain, released under CC0, and makes it easy to contact members of Congress using online forms. The new action tool we're creating will be free software, so anyone can hack on and improve it. That means it will be customizable—the community can improve it and hold it to the high level of security that should be the standard for all infrastructure projects and tools for change. And it won’t just be for EFF: anybody can customize this system to contact Congress.

Thanks to our partners at Taskforce.is and the Sunlight Foundation, we’ve got a prototype of the new system ready.

Now, we need your help.

 Calling all techs.

We finished the basic backend for the new contacting Congress tool, but now we need tech volunteers to help us complete the project.

Here’s the challenge: Each member of Congress has a special form that their own constituents can use to contact them. Each form is different: some require a CAPTCHA, some require a title, some require you to choose a topic from a dropdown list. Our new action center will let you connect directly to these Congressional forms for your elected officials whenever you want to submit a letter about an issue you care about. However, we need to program for each unique form used for individual members of Congress.

To that end, we need volunteers to conduct tests on the forms of each of the 500+ members of Congress. We created a simple bookmarklet that you can install in your browser, then visit our action center hub and test out different members of Congress. It’s easy to use, and it takes 4-10 minutes to test a Congressional form and make sure it works.

How many volunteers do you need?

We’re looking for between 10 and 30 people who can commit time to this project. We’re hoping to find several people who can work 4-5 hours on this, and then we’re hoping for 10 people who will be willing to spend one or two days on this project.

How technical do I need to be?

Not very. You should be comfortable using Github, having basic programming proficiency in at least one language and have a reasonable grasp of HTML and Javascript. Experience collaborating via IRC is handy, but not critical.

Do more. 

People contact EFF frequently with offers to help. I want to help you, they tell us.  I want to contribute more than just money. What can I do?

This is it. We really need this system to work so that our voices can be heard in the halls of Congress. And we can only be successful if folks like you (yes you) step up and donate a few hours to help us finish this off.

There’s no tool currently available that would do what we want to do using secure, free software. With a system like this in place, EFF’s efficacy in advocating for your rights can increase dramatically.

We can’t do this without the support and engagement of our best supporters. Want to get involved? Email rainey@eff.org.

It’s not hard and we’ll show you how.

We created these instructions (including video) on how to get started.

Most importantly, we’re available on IRC pretty much all the time. If you bump into problems, just let us know and we’ll try to troubleshoot. Find us on #opencongress on chat.freenode.net

Ready to get involved? Send an email to rainey@eff.org if you want more information or are ready to get involved.

We want to show you some love.

The main reason to take part in this is because you want to help EFF and the Sunlight Foundation, and you believe that the world is a better place when everyday people can contact Congress simply and easily.

Nonetheless, we want to shower you with mountains of amazing swag to thank you for your help. 

Here are the prize bundles for volunteers who make:

 40+ commits to the project on Github

  • Our undying gratitude
  • An EFF hat

150+ commits to the project on Github

  • Our undying gratitude
  • 1 year EFF membership -- for yourself, as a gift for a friend, or in memory of someone who inspired you.
  • An EFF hat
  • An EFF sticker pack
  • An EFF shirt

300+ commits to the project on Github:

  • Our undying gratitude
  • 1 year EFF membership -- for yourself, as a gift for a friend, or in memory of someone who inspired you.
  • The famous EFF NSA Hoodie
  • An EFF hat
  • An EFF sticker pack
  • An EFF shirt
  • Free entry to any EFF-hosted party (typically, this is our Pioneer Awards and our birthday party, both of which are in San Francisco. Note that the DefCon party is hosted for EFF by someone else, so we cannot guarantee entry to that.)
  • A public profile on the EFF website, under a soon-to-be-created ‘tech volunteers’ section.

We really need you. Please email  rainey@eff.org  to let us know if you can help out.

 

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pfctdayelise
7 days ago
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Melbourne, Australia
Askew
6 days ago
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The Ada Initiative founders on funding activism for women in open source

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This week, Ada Initiative founders Mary Gardiner and Valerie Aurora wrote about Funding Activism for Women in Open Source in the Funding issue of Model View Culture, drawing on lessons from their first years raising money for the Ada Initiative:

We founded the Ada Initiative with the principle of paying fair market wages to anyone doing work for us more than a few hours a week. In 2010, this was a moonshot. In 2014, it's increasingly how things are done. More and more diversity in technology initiatives are becoming paid activities, and a growing proportion of the technology industry recognizes this labour as something worth paying for[…]

[F]ull-time diversity activists who want to do effective, controversial, culture-changing work must often work out how to pay themselves, rather than taking existing jobs at tech companies or diversity in tech non-profits.

What follows is a survey of some of the most popular funding sources: corporate sponsorship, individual donations, and consulting and training.

Read the full article, The Ada Initiative Founders on Funding Activism for Women in Open Source, at Model View Culture to learn more about the rationale for each of these funding sources… and their pitfalls!

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Australian Attorney General Picks Surveillance Over Fair Use on U.S. Visit

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"Australia is ready for, and needs, a fair use exception now." These were the unambiguous words of the Australian Law Reform Commission's report investigating how to modernize the country's copyright laws. Specifically, the Commission called for a fair use doctrine that resembles that of the U.S., with the same four-factor balancing test.

So then you might expect that when George Brandis, Australia's Attorney General, makes his first official trip to the United States—the one he concluded just days ago—he would take the opportunity to meet with American experts on fair use. They could discuss the areas where the law has proven flexible in accommodating unforeseen uses, how the balance between specificity and flexibility is continuously struck, and what he might hope to bring back to his home country.

You might be disappointed to learn, then, that despite the straightforwardness of the Commission's recommendation, Brandis has pointedly refused to explore the idea of fair use in Australia. Though he received the Commission's report in November, he waited until February to publish it—and even then, only alongside his own misguided proposal: that Australia should establish a three-strikes-style graduated response program.

Along those lines, instead of meeting with copyright scholars and fair use expert on this week's trip to Washington, DC, Brandis met with the executive director of the Center for Copyright Information—the organization behind the U.S. graduated response system known as "Six Strikes," or the Copyright Alert System.

In terms of evidence-based policy making, this is a failure. For one thing, he needn't come all the way to the U.S. to find out how graduated response programs work (or don't). Australian copyright scholar Rebecca Giblin has conducted an exhaustive study on the effect of these programs and found "remarkably little evidence" that they were effective in reducing infringement, increasing legitimate markets, or improving access to knowledge and culture.

But more broadly, the fact that the rest of Brandis's agenda consisted of meetings with senior officials at intelligence agencies like the NSA, FBI, and CIA, raises major red flags for user privacy. And indeed, politicians in Australia have recently re-introduced mandatory data retention proposals for Internet service providers, after similar proposals suffered defeat just last year. Perhaps unsurprisingly, these proposals have the backing of Attorney General Brandis, who has repeatedly defended NSA spying during parliamentary question time.

Brandis may consider increased surveillance to be a two-for-one special: take some visible action to look strong on national security and at the same time appease the legacy content industries that want to make Internet companies snoop on their users.

Australians should demand better. Reforms that would empower users, like fair use, merit serious consideration. An obsessive devotion to mass surveillance at home and abroad does not.

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pfctdayelise
9 days ago
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Melbourne, Australia
Askew
8 days ago
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The Most Beautiful Trees In The World Portland Japanese Garden...

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The Most Beautiful Trees In The World

  1. Portland Japanese Garden, Portland, Oregon. Photo: Unknown
  2. Red maples trees path. Photo: Ildiko Neer
  3. Most beautiful wisteria tree in the world. Photo: Brian Young
  4. Yellow autumn in Central Park, New York. Photo: Christopher Schoenbohm
  5. Amazing Angel Oak Tree, Charlston, Photo by Mark Requidan.
  6. Cherry blossom tree path, Germany. Photo: Shoeven
  7. California in autumn. Photo: Mizzy Pacheco
  8. Jacaranda trees in bloom, South Africa. Photo: Falke
  9. Ponthus beech tree in Brocéliande forest, France. Photo: Christophe Kiciak
  10. Beautiful cherry blossom road. Photo: Unknown
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1 public comment
xbai
9 days ago
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Any place like this in bc?
sness
8 days ago
hmm, we should look for it
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