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Just for Fun: Is Truncating the Y-Axis Dishonest?

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What do you think?

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Thanks to @WyoWeeds!

Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the co-author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

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pfctdayelise
1 day ago
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ha cute
Melbourne, Australia
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A linguist friend sent in these two covers of the 1972 and 1973...

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The Chicago "which" hunt - Papers from the Relative Clause Festival


You take the high node, and I'll take the low node - Papers from the Comparative Syntax Festival

A linguist friend sent in these two covers of the 1972 and 1973 proceedings of the Chicago Linguistics Society. Two questions: 

1) Why aren’t we still using pun-filled names like this? 
2) Can we go back to calling conferences “festivals”? 

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pfctdayelise
1 day ago
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yes yes!
Melbourne, Australia
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sexetc:crotchetybushtit:50shadesofacceptance:superdodirty: it ok...

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sexetc:

crotchetybushtit:

50shadesofacceptance:

superdodirty:

it ok to not be ready

Please spread this shit like wildfire. People go on and sit through the whole experience and they’re uncomfortable because they just want to please their partner and they don’t tell them that they want to stop because they are not ready. It’s okay not to be ready. 

notice here that consent is revoked without ever saying no and consent goes so far beyond yes/no!!!!!!

Make sure you and your partner are always communicating and on the same page, because if you give consent you can change your mind at any time.

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sarcozona
2 days ago
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<3
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What Books Could Be Used to Rebuild Civilization?: Lists by Brian Eno, Stewart Brand, Kevin Kelly & Other Forward-Thinking Minds

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One particularly distressing hallmark of late modernity can be characterized as a cultural loss of the future. Where we once delighted in imagining the turns civilization would take hundreds and even thousands of years ahead—projecting radical designs, innovative solutions, great explorations, and peculiar evolutionary developments—we now find the mode of forecasting has grown apocalyptic, as climate change and other catastrophic, man-made global phenomena make it difficult to avoid some very dire conclusions about humanity’s impending fate. We can add to this assessment the loss of what we may call the “long view” in our day-to-day lives.

As the Long Now Foundation co-founder Stewart Brand describes it, “civilization is revving itself into a pathologically short attention span,” driven by “the acceleration of technology, the short-horizon perspective of market-driven economics, the next-election perspective of democracies, or the distractions of personal multi-tasking.” Such is the texture of modern existence, and though we may run our hands over it daily, remarking on how tightly woven the fabric is, we seem to have few-to-no mechanisms for unweaving—or even loosening—the threads. Enter the Long Now Foundation and its proposal of “both a mechanism and a myth” as a means encouraging “the long view and the taking of long-term responsibility.”

libraryfar

Image courtesy of Because We Can

Inspired by computer scientist Daniel Hill’s idea for a Stonehenge-sized clock that “ticks once a year, bongs once a century, and the cuckoo comes out every millennium,” the foundation proposes a number of projects and guidelines for restoring long-term thinking, including “minding mythic depth,” “rewarding patience,” and “allying with competition.” The clock, initially a thought experiment, is becoming a reality, as you can see in the short video above, with a massive, “monument scale” version under construction in West Texas and scale prototypes in London and the Long Now Foundation’s San Francisco headquarters. Largely a symbolic gesture, the “10,000 year clock,” as it’s called, has been joined with another, eminently practical undertaking reminiscent of Isaac Asimov’s Encyclopedia Galactica—a “library of the deep future.”

One wing of this library, the Manual for Civilization, aims to compile a collection of 3,500 books in the Foundation’s physical space—books deemed most likely to “sustain or rebuild civilization.” To begin the project, various future-minded contributors have been asked to make their own lists of books to add. The first list comes from musician/composer/producer/musical futurist and founding board member Brian Eno, who named the foundation. Other notable contributors include Long Now Foundation president Stewart Brand and board member and co-founder of Wired magazine Kevin Kelly. Below, see the first ten titles from each of these futurist’s lists, and further down, links to the full list of contributors’ selections so far. As you scan the titles below, and browse through each contributor’s list, consider why and how each of these books would help humanity rebuild civilization, and suggest books of your own in the comments.

10 Titles from Brian Eno’s Manual for Civilization list

10 Titles from Stewart Brand’s Manual for Civilization list

10 Titles from Kevin Kelly’s Manual for Civilization list

Once again, these are only excerpts from longer lists by these three futuristic thinkers. For their complete selections, click on their lists below, as well as those from such cultural figures as sci-fi writer Neal Stephenson and Brain Pickings’ editor Maria Popova. And please let us know: Which books would you include in the “Manual for Civilization” library project, and why? You can also add your own suggestions for the growing library at the Long Now Foundation’s website.

Related Content:

What Books Should Every Intelligent Person Read?: Tell Us Your Picks; We’ll Tell You Ours

Neil deGrasse Tyson Lists 8 (Free) Books Every Intelligent Person Should Read

The 10 Greatest Books Ever, According to 125 Top Authors (Download Them for Free)

Josh Jones is a writer and musician based in Durham, NC. Follow him at @jdmagness


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pfctdayelise
3 days ago
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No idea now how I came across this, but I was thinking about this stuff a few months ago visiting museums learning about the history of making porcelain and so on. I have my doubts that even the most detailed instruction book could cover all the implicit knowledge to recreate some of the things we know now from scratch.

Also interesting thoughts here about how our collective take on the future has changed.
Melbourne, Australia
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aninventoryofthepossible:Huge if true

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aninventoryofthepossible:

Huge if true

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5 public comments
tante
1 day ago
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Cookie Monster wisdom.
Oldenburg/Germany
luizirber
3 days ago
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Mind blowing
East Lansing, MI
digdoug
3 days ago
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Lasagna is just spaghetti flavored cake!
Louisville, KY
WorldMaker
4 days ago
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#deepthoughts
Louisville, Kentucky
smadin
4 days ago
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god bless Cookie Monster.
Boston

pytest development reorganization, adopt pytest month!

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pytest1Today I went live with shifting pytest development to be more community driven. During a discussion at FOSDEM 2015 a significant subset of pytest contributors decided to create two organisations at github and bitbucket and shift core pytest and several plugins to them, on the initial suggestion of Anatoly Bubenkoff.  See the new pytest contribution page for details.  The teams currently have a dozen members and we are looking forward to integrate more contributors which all get full access and commit rights to all repositories, can push to the website and release to pypi.

Also at FOSDEM 2015, core pytest contributor Brianna Laugher suggested and started the Adopt pytest month initiative which will bring together pytest contributors, users and Open Source projects interested to use pytest in their project.  Many pytest contributors and practioners will participate which means you get excellent support for bringing your testing efforts up to speed with pytest.

The pytest team is also working towards a pytest-2.7 release, take a peak at the current changelog.  If you like to get something in, now is a good time to submit a pull request.  Or, if you are working with a company you may contract merlinux which in turns contracts contributors to quickly resolve any issues you might have or organises in-house training or consulting.  Apart from the direct benefit for your company it’s also a good way to support a sustained and ever-improving testing infrastructure commons for Python (pytest, tox, devpi projects in particular).

Some pytest core contributors

pytest core contributors at FOSDEM 2015 in Bruxelles, left to right:  Andreas Pelme, Floris Bruynooghe, Ronny Pfannschmidt, Brianna Laugher, Holger Krekel, Anatoly Bubenkoff

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pfctdayelise
3 days ago
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Yay!
Melbourne, Australia
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